CISCE Publications


Hello people!

You may have heard your friends or teachers talking about going through the Pupils’ Analysis or Specimen Question Papers issued by the CISCE. Well, in our opinion, it’s imperative that you go through both of these.

The Analysis of Pupil Performance published by the Council every year for ICSE as well as ISC gives the suggested/sample/model answers that examiners are looking for in a student’s answer sheet, regarding the past year’s exam paper. Here, teachers who have corrected last year’s answer sheets of students provide their inputs to help fellow teachers and students improve their performance. It shows how one should write his/her answers during the exam, the format, the relevant points to include, the diagrams which one should include, etc. Please do go through the analysis! It will give you a clear insight regarding where students make mistakes and how you can avoid them.

Further, the Specimen Question Papers are also helpful as they give an idea regarding the question paper pattern/format, style of questions asked, etc.

You will find both of these at the following link:

http://cisce.org/publications.aspx

I was unaware of the Pupils’ Analysis during my tenth grade (ICSE), but it helped me much during my twelfth grade (ISC) and I highly recommend you check it out at least once. As I had scanned through the Specimen Papers before my exams when I was in tenth grade, I had felt that a couple questions were asked from the Specimen Paper during my Board exam, but I hadn’t tallied both papers (the actual and the specimen) to check for sure. So, don’t take these lightly! You’ll learn much by going through these two publications by the Council.

 

Also, spread the word about them to fellow classmates and friends who may not be aware of them! 🙂

History: Last-minute Tips


Here are a few last-minute tips for writing your History exam:

 

  • Write your answers in points and underline important keywords. Write to-the-point and don’t elaborate unnecessarily.
  • Use the fifteen minutes at the beginning of your exam very carefully. Take the time to decide which questions you wish to attempt and prioritize them. Keep in mind which one you will keep as an “extra,” in case you realize that you may not be able to do justice to a question which you had earlier decided to attempt. However, to ensure that doesn’t happen, use those fifteen minutes well!
  • Make sure you only mention the date if and when you are absolutely sure of it being correct. If not, it’s better to not write the date. (For example, it’s better to only write “The First War of Independence” instead of “The First War of Independence, 1875” or “The Revolt of 1875″… You get my point.)
  • Go through the important dates. If you haven’t made a list of the important dates yourself, you can always go through our own list here.
  • Also go through the names of the various leaders and their contributions. Revise who the Moderates and Radicals were, who brought about what major change, etc.
  • Make sure you are also able to associate the names of the various leaders with their photographs. During our tenth grade, our History teacher told us that it is possible that they may ask us to identify the national leader from the photograph. So, don’t forget to go through the photographs of important national leaders such as the Moderates and Radicals, etc.

 

Though there’s still time left, hope you do well in your exam! Keep visiting for more such tips! 🙂

 

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Geography: Last-minute Tips


Here are a few last-minute tips for writing your Geography exam:

* Do not overwrite in your maps. Mark the asked things lightly so that you can erase it easily if you feel like changing your answer.

* Make sure you label diagrams (if any) and things in the map in capital/uppercase letters.

* Check your calculation while attempting questions related to annual rainfall in the chapter, ‘Climate of India’.

* Revise frequently asked ‘give reason’ questions.

* Revise the map of India just before your exam begins and attempt the map first thing once your exam starts so that you still remember the markings.

* Write your name and necessary details along with question number and section on the map.

* Read the questions carefully while attempting topography so that you know what is being asked, especially in determining the distance of a place from another or the distance to a place from another. There are also other questions which can be tricky so pay attention to detail.

* Write your answers in points and underline important keywords. Write to-the-point and don’t elaborate unnecessarily.

* Use a pencil for marking things on the map. Shade the regions required (if any) with pencil, ex. polka dots, zig-zag, horizontal and vertical lines, checkered, etc. There’s no need to use different-colored pencils for shading.

* Make sure you include a key if required. Or else, mark the shaded area or symbol with the sub-question number, ex. Q1 is about the map of India and (i) to (x) are the sub-questions: draw an arrow next to the symbol and mark it with the respective sub-question from (i) to (x).

Hope you do well in your exam! Keep visiting for more such tips! 🙂

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This work by Helpline for ICSE Students (Class X – Class 10) is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

English II: Last-Minute Tips


On a reader’s request, here are some last-minute tips for writing your English II paper:

 

* Make sure to stick to the topic and answer only what has been asked in the question. Do not write the summary of the chapter/poem/act or points which are not at all required.

* While attempting the essay-type question, do not write the summary of the chapter/poem. Make sure your answer is detailed and do not hesitate to write even a small point that you feel is relevant to the question asked. Your essay-type question should be approximately 3 to 4 pages long. Although I stress on the fact that quantity does not matter, while writing this answer you should have a minimum word limit that fits 3 pages.

* If you have been asked whether or not you agree with a given statement, make sure you write ‘yes’ or ‘no’, ex. the question is “Do you agree with the author that…?” and your answer should include, “Yes, I agree that…” or “No, I do not agree that…”. You may elaborate further after stating your agreement/disagreement.

* Write in a paragraph style form. Do not write in points in your English II paper.

* Make sure your handwriting is legible. 😀

* Leave a few lines before and after every answer so that you have space to fit in additional points in case you leave anything out and remember to write them later.

* Names of authors and/or poets are generally not asked, but it will help you to mention the name while writing your answers, ex. “If by Rudyard Kipling is an enlightening poem that…”

* Start a new answer on a new page. Do not worry about wasting paper. It helps your paper look neat. However, there is no need to leave a whole page blank if you have merely used the first couple lines, but then again, there’s no reason why you can’t!

 

These are some tips I feel can prove helpful. Keep visiting for more such tips for your upcoming exams! 🙂

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This work by Helpline for ICSE Students (Class X – Class 10) is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Tip of the Day #8


Quick-Tips_1

Here’s a last-minute tip based on a question asked by a reader regarding how to write your answers and presentation of your answer script…

In the 2013 exams, we were allowed to start any section first while attempting our question paper. Whether you are attempting Section A first or Section B, it is better to keep this in mind…

Tip(s) of the Day: Students are required to complete the entire section that they have chosen first and answer all questions included in that section before attempting the rest of the sections.

Clearly mention the section heading at the top of the page in large, clear, bold, capital letters.

Always start a new section on a new page and before attempting a new section, check whether you have missed out on any question from the current section.

Do not answer a question from the first section after completing the second section – it is unlikely that your answer will be checked in such a case.

Please remain alert and take the above precautions. Good luck! 🙂

 

Also visit: How to Write Your Exam Papers (TIPS)

 

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This work by Helpline for ICSE Students (Class X – Class 10) is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.