Question of the Day #6


Without any further delay, the answers to the previous question are: (a)Hydrogen Sulphide (b) Nitrogen Dioxide or Bromine (c) Carbon Dioxide (d) Chlorine (e) Hydrogen (f) Carbon Dioxide (g) Ammonium Chloride.

Please note the change in the sequence of letters. By mistake, I had previously repeated the ‘(c)’.

Apparently, Shrish is the only reader who offered ‘bromine’ as a second answer in (b) so hats off to him! Ishan, meanwhile, gave a precise answer for (g). They both got all attempted answers correct! Congratulations to them and everyone else who got most answers correct.🙂

Regarding the current question (f), ammonia cannot be an option as fire extinguishers include ammonium phosphate to extinguish a flame and not merely ammonia. Hence, carbon dioxide is the ideal answer.

Question of the Day: Differentiate between ‘centromere’ and ‘centrosome’.

Leave your answers in the comment section below and we will get back to you tomorrow with the correct answer! Thank you and keep visiting!🙂 

7 thoughts on “Question of the Day #6

  1. Ishan Karia says:

    CENTROMERE
    ~ Present on chromosomes in the nucleus.
    ~ A region where two chromatids of a chromosome are attached.
    ~ Present in all cells
    ~ Chromosomes are attached to spindle fibres at the centromere.
    Splitting of centromere results in separation of chromatids of chromosomes
    CENTROSOME
    ~ Found in cytoplasm as a small clear area near nucleus.
    ~ Consists of two granule-like centrioles.
    ~ Present in animal cells only.
    ~ Helps in the formation of spindle fibres during cell division.

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  2. sadianajam says:

    plz dont send me mail again may nay ap say kaha hay na mujay ye questions nahi chaye may BISE fsd matric ki student ho ICSE ki student nahi ho so plz stop mailing this questions
    On Tue, Feb 11, 2014 at 7:27 PM, Helpline for ICSE Students (Class X –

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    • icsehelpline101 says:

      Ma’am, you must have subscribed to our posts by entering your e-mail id in the box in the upper right corner. When you subscribe to our posts, it means that you will receive automated e-mails whenever a new post has been published on this blog. If you wish to not receive any further e-mails from us, please click on the ‘Unsubscribe’ option given at the bottom of the e-mail. If you have any further queries, please let us know. Thank you.

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  3. Gursimran says:

    CENTROMERE:
    1.Point of attachment of two sister chromatids.
    2.Appear only during the cell division.
    3.Helps the chromosomes to cling to the spindle fibers .
    4.Divides itself for cytokinesis to maintain the same ‘2n’ no. of chromosomes,during mitosis and meiosis2.
    CENTROSOME:
    1. A cell organelle responsible for cell division.
    2. Consists of 2 centrioles, at right angles to each other, and aster rays.
    3. Divides itself during prophase at moves to the equator.
    4. Aster rays forms spindle fibers during cell division.
    5.Present in animal cell only.

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  4. palaknows says:

    CENTROMERE:
    1.Point of attachment of two sister chromatids.
    2.Appear only during the cell division.
    3.Helps the chromosomes to cling to the spindle fibers .
    4.Divides itself for cytokinesis to maintain the same ‘2n’ no. of chromosomes,during mitosis and meiosis2.
    CENTROSOME:
    1. A cell organelle responsible for cell division.
    2. Consists of 2 centrioles, at right angles to each other, and aster rays.
    3. Divides itself during prophase at moves to the equator.
    4. Aster rays forms spindle fibers during cell division.
    5.Present in animal cell only.

    Like

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